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Awareness Raising, Training and Education

Solar Cooling: Results Diagram Directs Stakeholders to Content of Interest

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on December 29, 2015
Task 48The best solar research results are of little use if they are not distributed and known to stakeholders from the industry, planning departments or public authorities involved in the related field work. This becomes an even more important point if the aim of the research is to “assist with the developing of a strong and sustainable market”. One example: Task 48 (Quality Assurance & Support Measures for Solar Cooling Systems) under the auspices of the IEA Solar Heating and Cooling programme. Between October 2011 and March 2015, a very dynamic group of 30 solar cooling experts teamed up to work on a wide range of topics. As many as 180 person months of research were at the disposal of the programme’s coordinators, which created a lot of interesting output. The cooling specialists accepted and met the challenge by presenting results in a clear structure on the above-shown diagram. The so-called Task 48 Results Diagram could serve as a best-practice model for other international research projects.
Source: task48.iea-shc.org/
 

IEA SHC Task 51: Urban Planners Know Little about Solar Energy Potential

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on November 3, 2015
IEA SHC Task 51During IEA SHC Task 51, Solar Energy in Urban Planning, the project partners evaluated the legal, process and education issues of solar in urban planning across the twelve member countries. What they found was: Planners and architects know little about the opportunities of solar energy usage. Solar energy in urban planning is also rarely a topic during university courses for architects or urban planners. The photo shows participants of the latest Task 51 meeting visiting a big PV installation. The meeting was held on the French island of Réunion from 28 September to 2 October. The task is about all types of solar energy. 
Photo: Maria Wall
 

How To – Solar Hot Water (2008)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on June 21, 2015

This is a how-to instructional guide on how to make your own solar thermal hot water heating system. It was created by the website GreenPowerScience.com. The guide explains how to devise a soalr thermal hot water heating system using a black rubber hose and a heat exchanger. The step by step walks the user through how to build and install the system and the various options they have in doing so.

Author: GreenPowerScience.com

 

Date of Publication: February 21, 2008

Pages: 8

Latvia: Newly founded Association Calls for EU-based Standards

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on March 26, 2015
TaupiRepresentatives of eight leading solar thermal system suppliers and manufacturers in Latvia, as well as two associations met in December 2014 to establish the Latvian Association for Solar Collectors (Latvijas Saules Kolektoru Asociācija). “Our association has been registered with the proper authorities, and we have membership requests from four to five other companies,” Raivis Šķērstens, Chairman of the newly established association, confirmed in March 2015. Šķērstens heads Latvian solar thermal manufacturer Sun Investments, which offers solar systems under the brand name Selsol. The other founding members from the industry are solar thermal system importers Taupi, Altenergo, Solar M Pro, Erxsol, EG inzenieri, Zeze and Saules kolektors. The photo shows the 72 collectors on the roof of Vidzeme’s nursery school, which includes a swimming pool.
Photo: Taupi
 

Ukraine/Georgia: Women for a Sunny Energy Supply in EECCA

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 5, 2014
WECFEnergy poverty is a widespread phenomenon throughout Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia (EECCA). Many poor people living in these regions can hardly pay the ever-rising electricity costs. To heat their houses in winter, they are often forced to burn wood, diesel or any other thing they can find, such as plastic - with all the harmful impacts on the environment. “Switch to the sun – live in comfort!” is what activists of Women in Europe for a Common Future (WECF) tell them in such a situation. WECF, an international non-governmental network of women’s and environmental organisations, is committed to helping people in rural areas in the Ukraine, Georgia and other countries of the EECCA region gain a sustainable energy supply, mainly by utilising solar water heaters. The photo shows the participants of a workshop with the newly built solar water heater in the city of Kamensk-Uralsk, Russia.
Photo: WECF/Ecoclub Ukraine
 

Mozambique: “The government is committed to the development of clean energy technologies”

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on May 29, 2013

Mozambique is one of the partner countries of the SOLTRAIN project, which has contributed to the implementation of solar thermal energy in four Southern African countries since 2009. Country partner in Mozambique is the Eduardo Mondlane University, UEM, in Maputo. Solarthermalworld.org spoke with Coordinator Dr Geraldo Nhumaio from the Faculty of Engineering about SOLTRAIN’s results so far, the current situation of the solar thermal market in Mozambique and the expectations for the recently started phase 2 of the project. The photo shows a solar hot water accumulator on the Muxungue Rural Hospital (supply and installation: Gavedra Moçambique).
Photo: Fundo Nacional de Energia - FUNAE

Southern Africa: SOLTRAIN's Demonstration Systems Achieve up to 800 kWh/m²a

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on February 28, 2013

The Austrian Development Agency (ADA) has agreed to sponsor also the second phase of the successful Southern African Solar Thermal Training and Demonstration Initiative (SOLTRAIN). At the beginning of December, the project partners from Austria, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe met to thrash out precisely how to implement SOLTRAIN 2. The aim of the project is to support the African partner countries when they change from a largely fossil energy supply system to a sustainable supply structure based on renewable energy in general and on solar thermal in particular. The picture shows a test facility at the Stellenbosch University in South Africa. The facility was established in phase 1 of the project to support local manufacturers in growing their business and improving their solar thermal technology.
Photo: AEE INTEC

MNRE Congrats for Winners of UNDP GSWH Project

Submitted by Baerbel Epp on September 13, 2012

India has been one of the great beneficiaries of the Global Solar Water Heating Market Transformation and Strengthening Initiative (GSWH Project). The initiative, which was financed and implemented by the UN organisations UNDP/UNEP and GEF, has sought to speed up the growth of the solar water heater market around the globe. To reach its aim, the GSWH project has chosen a variety of options: generate demand, strengthen the supply chain, adopt quality measures and establish a supportive regulatory environment. The UNDP team has already pointed to India as the most successful example among the benefitting countries. To honour valuable contributions, the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) organised a National Workshop on 23 August 2012 in New Delhi. At the workshop, the Energy Minister, Dr Farooq Abdullah, presented a total of thirteen awards to State Nodal Agencies, municipal corporations and Channel Partners. The GSWH project started in September 2008 and will end by December 2012.
Photo: Jaideep Malaviya

Advancing Solar Water Heating in Southern Africa - The Example of Soltrain (2011)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on May 14, 2012

This report evaluates the progress of the SOLTRAIN project in Southern Africa in the period 2009-2011. The project’s initiation was covered by solarthermalworld.org back in 2009, and is available here.

Training Course on Solar District Heating (2011)

Submitted by Raquel Ponte Costa on November 23, 2011

This document comprises training material developed in the framework of the SDHtake-off project with the support of Intelligent Energy Europe Programme. It has been designed as a “pool” of information to be used by all training organizations. It gives a broad overview of the solar thermal technologies employed for district heating, their characteristics as well as the legislative and technical requirements that are applicable in the EU.

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